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Burberry aims for mcommerce via fall/winter mobile ad

By
August 26, 2013

Burberry banner ad on Vanity Fair

British fashion house Burberry is aiming for an increase in mcommerce with a banner advertisement on Vanity Fair’s mobile-optimized site.

The Burberry ad features the fall/winter collection and the brand’s name in a rotating ad. The brand is likely to catch consumers’ attention by creating a constantly moving ad on Vanity Fair’s homepage.

“It seems that Vanity Fair’s mobile site is shaping up to be the new blimp at the Superbowl for luxury retailers,” said said Melody Adhami, president of Plastic Mobile, Toronto.

“I think by ensuring an effortless experience on the other end of the mobile banner ad, Burberry shows that it seems to understand the mobile shopper and their needs,” she said.

Ms. Adhami is not affiliated with Burberry, but agreed to comment as an industry expert.

 

Burberry declined to comment directly.

Fall into autumn
The Burberry banner ad appeared at the top of Vanity Fair’s homepage on its mobile site. With this prominent location, it is likely to be one of the first things viewers see.


Vanity Fair mobile homepage

The ad rotated the words that are shown on the white background every couple of seconds.

First, the ad would show the label’s name in its classic font. Then, the ad reads “Introducing autumn/winter 2013.”


Banner ad

A click through on the ad brings consumers to Burberrys mobile-optimized site where the autumn/winter collection is currently being featured.


Burberry’s mobile-optimized site

Once on the mobile site, consumers can explore products by collection and type of product, add items to a shopping cart to purchase and login to access their accounts.

Mobile fashion
Other brands have recently pushed new fall apparel and accessories through mobile ads.

For instance, fashion label Diane von Furstenberg promoted its fall/winter collection with a mobile ad on New York magazine’s The Cut aimed at fashion enthusiasts.

With a clean shot that features the brand’s name, logo and Web site, the label seemed to be targeting fashion enthusiasts who do not need a call to action to click-through. The click-through maintains the simplicity promised by the ad and can browse among various categories on the landing site (see story).

Furthermore, department store chain Nordstrom is pushing a new collection of Ugg boots through a mobile ad that allows consumers to swipe through different products without leaving the original site.

The ad appeared as a banner on American Media’s Shape magazine’s mobile-optimized site. By allowing consumers to browse products easily without losing their page, consumers are likely to be more inclined to make a purchase (see story).

Mobile banner ads can help draw consumers’ attention to new collections, which can possibly lead to an increase in mcommerce.

Burberry’s new ad will likely reach consumers due to the constantly changing information that it displays.

“Burberry’s simple yet constantly changing, rich ad will probably have a much better chance of capturing a reader’s attention than a static ad,” Ms. Adhami said.

“This is because, as more and more consumers are turning to their mobile devices to read their favorite magazines and shop their favorite retailers, we are becoming desensitized to ads everywhere,” she said.

“To avoid this consumer ‘banner blindness,’ brands are having to get creative to get our attention.”

Final take
Erin Shea, editorial assistant on Luxury Daily, New York 

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Erin Shea is an editorial assistant on Luxury Daily. Her beats are apparel and accessories, government, home furnishings, legal and privacy, nonprofits and retail. Reach her at erin@napean.com.

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